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Clinton Warns China on Iran Sanctions

China/Japan | YP - Sat, 01/30/2016 - 05:00

The secretary of state told China on Friday that it would face diplomatic isolation if it did not fall in line.

Categories: China/Japan News

Censors Keep Mainland in the Dark About HK Protests

China Digital Times - 2 hours 25 min ago

As pro-democracy student protests continue to unfold in Hong Kong, Chinese authorities are ramping up censorship to stop news of the unrest from spreading on the mainland. The Los Angeles Times reports:

Striking photos, videos and news about Hong Kong’s ongoing democracy protests and clashes with police have exploded across TV, radio, newspapers worldwide in recent days, to say nothing of Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites. But thanks to a near-complete information blackout by Chinese censors, most people in mainland China remain unaware of the situation in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Major state-run news outlets carried only brief mentions of the confrontations, if any, and the subject has been censored off popular mainland-based social media services, including Weibo and Weixin, also known as WeChat.

[...] On the Chinese-language homepage of the official New China News Agency and the Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily, there was not a single story mentioning the protests in Hong Kong. Front pages of the usually liberal Beijing News and Southern Metropolis Daily have been filled with two unrelated stories: One about a directive from the State Council on government meetings; another on the extradition of a corrupted official, as part the government’s efforts to showcase the success of its anti-graft campaign. [Source]

China Media Project’s David Bandurski notes the appearance of two Xinhua reports that have been republished elsewhere; one “woefully [out]dated,” and the other containing “patent falsehoods — the result either of consummately poor reporting or willful distortion of the truth.” Similarly, The Guardian’s Jonathan Kaiman reports that one state-controlled mainland TV channel aired misleading images showing people gathered to support the Chinese government:

On Sunday night, tens of thousands of protesters throughout Hong Kong faced down teargas and baton charges, but the state-controlled broadcaster Dragon TV did not show these images. Instead, it cheerfully announced that 28 civil society groups had spent the weekend in Tamar Park voicing support for the central government’s decisions on the region’s political future.

The broadcast showed a crowd of people waving Chinese flags to celebrate the upcoming 65th anniversary of country-wide Communist party rule. “We all hope Hong Kong can be prosperous and stable,” said a young man wearing glasses and a red polo shirt. “I think the National People’s Congress’s decision can bring us a step closer to fulfilling our requirement for universal suffrage.”

[...] “The Communist party is very clear that if the general election were to indeed happen in Hong Kong, people from many places in the mainland would want the same thing,” said Hu Jia, a prominent activist in Beijing. “What Hong Kongers have been doing – the student strike, public voting, protesting, and occupying the central city – could definitely inspire a lot of people in China.” [Source]

On Sunday night, Instagram joined the list of social media services blocked in mainland China as users shared images of the tear-gas-filled streets of downtown Hong Kong. From The Washington Post:

No more sepia-tinged phone pics of your latest meal in Shanghai or, perhaps more significant to Chinese censors’ minds, no more shots of Hong Kong officers in riot gear unloading canisters of pepper spray and tear gas into the faces of Hong Kong’s largely peaceful demonstrators.

[...] The protesters’ clashes with police Sunday night and into the wee hours of Monday were accompanied by a barrage of hashtags: #hk, #hongkong, etc.#Occupycentral, a rallying cry for democracy activists of late, had 9,103 posts as of Monday afternoon. So when the service turned off within hours of protesters getting tear-gassed, many Instagram users assumed Monday that Chinese censors had decided it was not in their interest to let pictures circulate of Chinese residents standing up en masse to local authorities. [Source]

To maintain the flow of information, many protesters have turned to FireChat, an instant messaging app that works locally over Bluetooth without the need for an Internet connection. From The New York Times: 

Amid swelling pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong, protesters are turning to FireChat, a new app that allows them to send messages without a cellular or Internet connection.

[...] Introduced in March, FireChat makes use of a cellphone’s radio and Bluetooth communications to create a network between phones close to one another — up to about 80 yards — without connecting to the Internet. If a cellular signal or wireless network is available, the app uses that.

In 24 hours starting on Sunday afternoon, the app, which allows users to host public chat rooms, added 100,000 users in Hong Kong, and usage in the city peaked on Sunday night at 33,000 simultaneous users, according to Open Garden, the San Francisco company that distributes the app. [Source]

Meanwhile, Offbeat China suggested that the protests show how censorship has eroded Weibo’s position as an online “public square”, as activity continues to shift to the more private WeChat:

“Tonight, Weibo is for Paris, Wechat is for Hong Kong.” One prominent account on Weibo commented on Sunday night. While posting pictures of fashion shows in Paris on Weibo, she was sharing, on Wechat, pictures of tear gas filled streets in Hong Kong.

Wechat, as a messaging tool, acts more like a hybrid of Whatsapp and Facebook – one can chat with and get status updates from only those who follow back. It’s exactly such closed and personal networks that make Wechat a safe net for discussing sensitive topics in China. On one hand, such personal communications are much more difficult to censor by keywords, like on Weibo. On the other, commenting within an enclosed personal circle gives users a sense of security – someone who isn’t willing to share Hong Kong protest pictures on Weibo, a public platform, may be OK with sharing with a couple close friends on Wechat, a private network. [Source]

At CNN, Wilfred Chan looks at the important role that information technology has played in facilitating the protest movement in Hong Kong:

It’s a high-tech response to a high-stress situation. Armed with top-of-the-line phones on some of the world’s fastest mobile networks, Hong Kong’s young protesters are able to organize themselves at a lightning pace older generations of activists could have only dreamed of.

“The Internet is a critical reason these protests have exploded so quickly and so out of control,” says Li. “We all want instant news, and people are very unsettled.”

[...] Just before the clock struck midnight Sunday, at least 1,000 protesters — many heeding messages that had been posted online just minutes before — suddenly flooded the main road in Hong Kong’s Mong Kok shopping district, leaving police surprised and outnumbered.

[...] The police seemed unable to respond, and withdrew from the scene. Along with many other parts of Hong Kong, Mong Kok remains occupied with protesters Monday evening. [Source]

In spite of everything, Christina Larson reports at Bloomberg Businessweek that many people interviewed in Beijing were aware of the unfolding events in Hong Kong. Views of the protests varied widely:

Within mainland China, some said they were cheering on Hong Kong’s democracy activists and wished their Chinese peers had the same courage to fight for “freedom.” Others wondered whether public demonstrations were futile and darkly recalled the brutal 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. Still others said the yawning antagonism between mainlanders and Hong Kongers, fueled by quarrels over the influx of mainland tourists and capital into the islands in recent years, meant they felt limited sympathy for Hong Kong’s struggles.

[...] One journalist at a state-run newspaper in a southern Chinese city said she was not allowed to report on the Hong Kong protests, yet was avidly discussing events with her peers. “We are talking about what is real freedom,” and whether they would join in similar demonstrations, even in the face of baton-wielding cops. “A friend of mine said he is so proud of them [the protesters]. … Another friend says the chaos in Hong Kong makes him treasure what we have today,” meaning apparent safety and stability. She said they were all reminded, darkly, of the 1989 crackdown, which, despite being erased from Chinese history books, most knew a bit about: “My father and uncles told me [about it].” [Source]

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Categories: China News from China

Hong Kong Protests: All Eyes on Xi Jinping

China Digital Times - 2 hours 30 min ago

As protests continue in Hong Kong, many observers are speculating over potential outcomes of the movement and how Beijing will respond to a sustained challenge to its authority. In the Washington Post, Ishaan Tharoor writes:

The protests appear to be growing. Wednesday and Thursday mark a national holiday in China, and many expect what takes place on those days to define the current unrest. If the sit-ins and demonstrations continue with the intensity they’ve already shown, there’s a chance that local security forces could crack down more violently than they have so far, including perhaps using rubber bullets. That sort of violent response could be a disaster for Hong Kong’s government, which would face mounting pressure from the territory’s voluble civil society and media.

For China’s rulers, the choices seem more clear. They’ve already signaled their lack of interest in allowing a true democracy to flourish in Hong Kong. State media in the past have pointed to the arrogance and “racism” of Hong Kong’s anti-Chinese activists; an influential Chinese commentator notoriously labeled Hong Kongers “dogs of British imperialists.” China is unlikely to allow the protesters to win many concessions. [Source]

Few expect the Beijing government to back down, yet how that could play out remains to be seen. As Tania Branigan points out in the Guardian, these protests are unprecedented for Hong Kong, even considering large-scale protests which successfully tabled planned anti-sedition legislation in 2003:

While the movement appears to be largely middle class to date, many of those involved say daily life is increasingly tough for ordinary people in the city, citing issues such as rising property prices.

Such concerns have been developing over recent years, along with unhappiness about large-scale migration from the mainland.But the movement sparked by all these factors has been a shock to a city which sees itself as conservative and law-abiding. Even the keenest supporters of the protests are taken aback by their scale and self-confidence.

“This is a watershed,” said Hung Ho-fung, of Johns Hopkins University. “This time people are using civil disobedience and setting up barricades. There’s also the disruptive aspect; in the past, they emphasised that demonstrations would not affect everyday life. This time they really don’t care. I really haven’t seen anything like this in Hong Kong history.”

But, he warned: “Beijing has put itself in a corner and I don’t think it can back down.” [Source]

In the New York Times, Louisa Lim argues that the protests have more at stake than just electoral reforms, as Hong Kong people are trying to forge their own identity, which Beijing is determined to oppose:

For China’s leaders, the accusation that foreign forces are manipulating students is easier to countenance than the idea that Hong Kongers are standing up for the high degree of autonomy promised to them. As students and activists faced off riot police amid the canyons of skyscrapers, one popular chant was simply, “Hong Kong People! Hong Kong People!”

Such an assertion of a separate and distinct identity is anathema to President Xi, whose xenophobic nationalism can accept only one state-approved version of what it means to be Chinese.

But even as the protests continue to swell, Beijing seems to hold all the cards. Yet even if it succeeds in tamping down the anger in Hong Kong — which is unlikely — its gains can be fleeting at best.

The moment that Hong Kong citizens have been dreading for 17 years has finally arrived. And the ramifications will ripple out, to Taiwan, whose residents are increasingly wary of the idea of reunification, as well as to the fringes of Beijing’s empire, where it is struggling with suicidal Tibetan protests and a murderous ethnic insurgency in the northwestern province of Xinjiang. [Source]

For Xi Jinping, the protests present a major dilemma that is positioned to define his tenure. In the New York Times, Edward Wong and Chris Buckley write:

Hong Kong has been under Beijing’s sovereignty for long enough now that even modest concessions could send signals across the border that mass protests bring results — a hint of weakness that Mr. Xi, a leader who exudes imperturbable self-assurance, seems determined to avoid, mainland analysts say. And small compromises are unlikely to placate a good many of the Hong Kong residents who have filled the streets.

Yet any attempt to remove protesters by force would inevitably raise parallels with the killing of democracy protesters in Beijing in 1989, an event that split the Communist Party and poisoned China’s relations with the outside world for years.

Hong Kong’s future, therefore, may rest heavily on whether Mr. Xi has the clout, skill and vision to figure out a solution that somehow keeps the territory stable without sparking copycat calls for change closer to home — and without dealing a heavy blow to his own prestige or his standing among the party elite. [Source]

In the Globe and Mail, Mark MacKinnon writes about Xi’s position in relation to his father, who was considered a moderate and who is rumored to have opposed the June 4th military crackdown on protesters in Tiananmen Square:

What happens in Hong Kong over the coming days will tell us a lot about where China is heading in the era of Xi Jinping. A negotiated solution that appeases some or all of the protesters would suggest China finally has the kind of leader that the Communist Party’s undemocratic “meritocracy” was supposed to produce. The sidelining of Mr. Xi’s enemies – and his own genuine personal popularity among ordinary Chinese – gives him the power to surprise everyone in how he handles the Occupy Central movement.

A crackdown, particularly one that involves use of the People’s Liberation Army, would tell us China is in for another dark decade of stifling repression.

Once more, the early signs aren’t good. Hong Kong police have already used tear gas and pepper spray in failed efforts to disperse the crowd, which has instead continued to grow. Classic Chinese information-control measures have been deployed, with the terms Occupy Central and Umbrella Revolution (a moniker gained as protesters used their umbrellas to deflect tear-gas canisters) now blocked on the Weibo social network. Instagram – where photos of the umbrella-wielding protesters defying police were rapidly spreading – is no longer accessible in mainland China, consigning it to the same virtual prison as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

In another sign of the government’s thinking, China’s state-controlled media has condemned Occupy Central as an “illegal pro-democracy movement” responsible for “undermining social stability” in Hong Kong. Those are heavy words in the People’s Republic. [Source]

But not everyone believes a crackdown is inevitable. Human Rights Watch’s Nicholas Bequelin tweeted:

.@orvilleschell and I are on the @charlieroseshow tonight. Orville thinks bloody crackdown possible; I think dumping CY Leung more likely.

— Nicholas Bequelin 林伟 (@Bequelin) September 29, 2014

On Vox, Zack Beauchamp interviews historian Jeffrey Wasserstrom about the protests and asks him to put them in a historical context:

ZB: Is this part of why these protests are so concerning from the Chinese government’s point of view? You’ve got something that seems like it has a lot of resonances with a deep tradition of protest in China, so it can’t easily be dealt with by force.

JW: That’s a concern. But I think we should also see it as related to other things that are haunting the Chinese Communist Party right now.

Moves away from authoritarianism in parts of the world other than China, for example, that involve large gatherings in central squares. There’s a way in which this links up to things from the specifically Chinese past, but it’s also something that links to the images of crowds in squares, whether in Ukraine or in Egypt. Those kinds of images are also on the minds of Chinese leaders.

It’s also a moment where there’s unrest across and all around the edges of China. You have a very funny moment now where Beijing has been making these efforts to expand the edges of the territory they control, with moves towards asserting control over islands that other countries claim. But at the same time, you have the edges of what they think of as Greater China plagued by discontent of other kinds: places like the [heavily Muslim Chinese province] Xinjiang or Tibet. There were also protests in Taiwan last spring that were in part pushing back against efforts to bring together Taiwan and the mainland at least in economic terms.

So the Hong Kong movement is linked to long-term traditions and history within China, it’s connected to things in other parts of the world, and it’s connected to quite different but simultaneously occurring challenges around the territory the Chinese government wants to claim authority over. [Source]

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Categories: China News from China

Senior officials appointed for corruption-hit province

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

TAIYUAN - Five senior officials were appointed Tuesday in the corruption-plagued North China's Shanxi province, local authorities said.

Fugitive ends life on the lam The standing committee of the Shanxi provincial committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC), the decision-making body in the coal-rich province, announced the appointments made by the CPC Central Committee.

Huang Xiaowei, former vice minister of Supervision, was appointed a member of the standing committee of the CPC Shanxi provincial committee and secretary of the provincial commission for discipline inspection, the anti-graft watchdog.

Huang's predecessor Li Zhaoqian was removed from the post.

Four others were also appointed members of the standing committee of the CPC Shanxi provincial committee. They are Wu Zhenglong, former secretary general of the CPC Chongqing municipal committee, Sun Shaocheng, former vice governor of Shandong, Wang Weizhong, former vice minister of Science and Technology, and Fu Jianhua, former vice director of the State Administration of Work Safety.

Fu Jianhua was also nominated as vice governor of Shanxi.

A handful of senior officials in Shanxi, including five members of the standing committee of the CPC Shanxi provincial committee, had been put under investigation for disciplinary violations.

Categories: Chinaganda

Trending: Traveler a dead ringer

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Pros and cons of Wi-Fi registration; mislaid ID card leads to sex charge and unlucky break turns out to be very fortunate

New approach to calling the roll

A journalism lecturer at Changsha University of Science and Technology in Hunan province has built a Wi-Fi system for students joining the local network to replace the traditional way of calling the roll, Sanxiang City Express reported.

The lecturer, who teaches a new media course, intends to have internet thinking involved in traditional classes but despite his innovative thinking, he cannot identify those who don't attend class although he can find out the number of students showing up.

Related:

Student reunites with teacher after 64 years

Lost ID card blamed for prostitution claim

A woman in Huaihua city, Hunan province was surprised to be accused of prostitution in Guangdong by police late last month, Law Weekly reported.

Having never been to Guangdong, investigations revealed that somebody had been using her identification card that had been lost more than a decade ago.

She was released and apologized to by the police.

Related:

Lost ID card used to register 30 phones

Traveler a dead ringer

People usually hold a piece of A4-sized paper bearing a name when picking up an unknown traveler from an airport. But one greeter went a step further.

A man held a black and white picture of the person he was waiting for with the name alongside the portrait at Changsha Huanghua International Airport, Sanxiang City Express reported.

The photo resembled a corpse, giving many passersby a shock. One of the arrivals said: "I really wondered if he got punched by that guy in the photo when they met. That photo is just like a portrait of the deceased".

Related:

Murder suspect escapes from airport

Luck comes in disguise

A man had to stay in a lottery shop for two days after leaving his key at home and his wife was on a business trip, according to Southern Metropolis Daily.

He had nothing to do so bought a lottery for 10 yuan ($1.7) and found he had won 6.66 million yuan.

Related:

Pork lottery

Paying her boyfriend gets cashier 8 years

A middle-aged female cashier at a medical training center was sentenced to eight years in prison for misuse of nearly 6 million yuan ($975,550) in public funds. She took the money for her British boyfriend, Beijing Times reported.

Pan Yangyang, 44, met the Briton through a dating website in May 2012. From September to November 2012, she misappropriated funds eight times for the man, who claimed to have a contract for an offshore oil project in Saudi Arabia and said he was short of money.

Related:

Men without money are rubbish ?

 

Categories: Chinaganda

Guangdong to blacklist firms for food, drug offences

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Authorities in southern China's Guangdong province are tightening the control over food and drug enterprises by setting up a blacklist, which will be made open to the public from Oct 1, Nanfang Daily reports.

Those enterprises which had been suspended to rectify or had their documents of permission revoked, or which had led on consumers with illegal advertising plots, will be included in the blacklist.

The blacklist will also provide detailed information on the company's basic information, illegal activities and punishment, as well as the name of the person in charge.

If a certain product is involved, its name, batch, identification, approval number and production license will be published on the internet.

Once blacklisted, the company will remain on the blacklist for two years if no other rules apply.

Local authorities are also pledging to invest more energy to update the blacklist, to check on the companies more frequently and unexpectedly.

Once a company on the blacklist commits inappropriate behaviour again, the company will receive a harsher punishment, even being banned from the business.

Categories: Chinaganda

Chinese show love for country ahead of National Day

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

October 1 marks the 65th anniversary of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and people across the country are showing their love for their country in front of the lens.

Pupils in Fuyang, Central China's Anhui province take a group photo with the national flag, Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua] 

A soldier in Jiaxing, East China's Zhejiang province, gives the national flag a thumbs-up. [Photo/Xinhua]

Firefighters in Jiaxing, East China's Zhejiang province pose with the national flag. [Photo/Xinhua] 

Kindergarten children in Huainan, Central China's Anhui province salute the national flag. [Photo/Xinhua]

Farmers in Luzhou, Southwest China's Sichuan province display a national flag made of sorghum and corn. [Photo/Xinhua]

College-graduate village officials in Hulun Buir, the Inner Mongolia autonomous region pose with their wishes to the motherland in front of the national flag. [Photo/Xinhua]

Residents in Dezhou, East China's Shandong province pose with the national flag. [Photo/Xinhua] 

 Tian'anmen Square dresses up for National Day Marking National Day in new flavor 

Categories: Chinaganda

Singapore issues travel advice to Hong Kong

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

SINGAPORE - Singaporeans in Hong Kong should avoid the crowds and demonstrations in Hong Kong, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) said in a travel notice on its website late Monday.

Warning that protests outside Hong Kong's government headquarters could spread to other parts of the city, MFA suggests that Singaporeans travelling to or residing in Hong Kong should " monitor the local news and developments closely and heed the instructions of local authorities."

It advises Singaporeans to e-register with the MFA to facilitate contact should the need arise, and also publishes emergency contact for those in need.

Singaporean travellers heading to Hong Kong, however, are undeterred, and tours and flights there are unaffected for now, reported the Strait Times on Tuesday.

Categories: Chinaganda

China marks first Martyrs' Day

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Pupils in Handan, North China's Hebei province, salute a monument to revolutionary martyrs on Sept 29, the day before the first Martyrs' Day of China. [Photo/Xinhua] 

 

BEIJING -- A day before the National Day, China rallied to honor and remember the deceased national heroes on the first Martyrs' Day.

The country's top leaders, including President Xi Jinping, paid silent tribute and offered flower baskets at the Monument to the People's Heroes in Tian'anmen Square, downtown Beijing, on Tuesday morning.

China Central Television live broadcast the event.

China's top legislature approved Sept 30 as the Martyrs' Day last month, to commemorate those who lost their lives fighting for national independence and prosperity. 

Martyrs, as defined by the government, are "people who sacrificed their lives for national independence and prosperity, as well as the welfare of the people in modern times, or after First Opium War (1840-1842)."

It is estimated that China has about 20 million martyrs. However, only 1.93 million of them have been named in the government's directory while the rest could not be identified. The number increases by about 300 annually in recent years.

 

Soldiers in the island province of Hainan take their hats off as they pay their respects to revolutionary martyrs on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua] 

 

Pupils in Luzhou, Southwest China's Sichuan province, pay their respect to revolutionary martyrs on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Soldiers pay tribute to the Yuhuatai Monument to Revolutionary Martyrs in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua]  

 

Soldiers in Taizhou, East China's Zhejiang province, pay tribute to martyrs' memorial on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua]  

 

Veterans and soldier salute the Monument to Revolutionary Martyrs of the Korean War (1950-1953) in Dandong, Northeast China's Liaoning province, on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Pupils in Zaozhuang, East China's Shandong province, lay flowers at a cemetery of unknown martyrs on Sept 29. [Photo/Xinhua] 

 

Categories: Chinaganda

China provides 5 mln yuan to help Ghana stem Ebola

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

ACCRA - China on Monday provided Ghana with 5 million yuan (833,000 U.S. dollars) worth of equipment and medical supplies to help the country battle Ebola outbreak which has claimed over 3,000 lives in African countries.

Sun Baohong, the Chinese ambassador to Ghana, urged the international community to stand together to prevail over the scourge of the epidemic at the signing ceremony.

"For the current epidemic situation in West Africa, China holds that it is important that the international society stay united," Sun stressed.

The ambassador reiterated China's support to the WHO and the United Nations in continuing to play necessary roles in

 China sends mobile laboratory testing team to Sierra Leone

Chinese medical supplies arrive in Ebola-affected Sierra Leone 

mobilizing global resources to fight the epidemic.

"Epidemic knows no borders, yet adversity reveals true friendship," she noted, adding that the aid would add a new chapter to China-Ghana relations.

She however pointed out that it was very important in the final analysis to address both the symptoms and root cause of the outbreak, adding: "We must both manage the immediate crisis and remove the root cause of the epidemic."

Sun called for efforts to accelerate the research and development of vaccines and drugs to combat the disease.

"Countries should increase input in Africa to help Africa enhance its public health capacity and achieve greater development, for this is the fundamental answer to preventing any future outbreaks," the Chinese envoy added.

She commended efforts by Ghanaian President John Dramani Mahama and the government in taking decisive and effective steps to coordinate with West African countries and the international community to combat the disease.

"This shows Ghana's strong leadership and the Pan-Africanist spirit of solidarity in going through thick and thin together with affected countries," Sun commended.

The aid to Ghana will include Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs), beds, sanitizers and other important equipment.

Cassiel Ato Forson, deputy minister of Finance, who signed for Ghana, praised the efforts of the Chinese government in helping to end the Ebola outbreak in the sub-region.

"We are grateful to China for the leading role it is playing in the fight against Ebola in the sub-region," Forson said.

He was particularly glad that the gesture had not been to Ghana alone, but also to other West African countries, expressing great gratitude to the Chinese government for the 173 medical workers it had dispatched to the sub-region to help combat the disease.

In addition to Ghana, the Chinese government is providing one million dollars cash, 2 million dollars worth of grain and food, and a group of specialists each to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

It is also providing a mobile and a fixed laboratory with corollary testing and security equipment for Sierra Leone; 10 million yuan worth of prevention and relief materials for Nigeria; five million yuan worth of materials each for Mali, Benin, Guinea Bissau and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

China is also providing two million U.S. dollars respectively for the African Union and the WHO to support their work in guiding and coordinating the fight against the epidemic.

Categories: Chinaganda

China launches anti-drug campaign

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

A new round of crackdowns on the illegal production and sale of drugs has begun in 108 cities across China, the Ministry of Public Security said on Monday.

The six-month campaign will target drug production, trafficking and selling. They'll increase their scope to drug dealing through the Internet and drug users, the ministry said in a statement.

China faces severe challenges in fighting against drug-related crimes, despite effective results achieved by international cooperation among China, Myanmar, Laos and Thailand, the ministry said.

"High-handed policy should be always adopted to harshly crack down on drug-related crimes," said minister of Public Security Guo Shengkun.

He urges more pragmatic international cooperation.

The ministry will supervise the nationwide crackdown and people in charge of the campaign will be held responsible if they are found ignoring their duty, according to the statement.

Chinese police arrested 58,000 people, confiscated 25,850 kilograms of drugs and busted more than 1,600 drug producing and selling rings in the first half of the year.

   

120 celebrities reportedly on police anti-drug list 

Special:China helps fight international war on drugs  

Categories: Chinaganda

Tour by train with your cars during National Day holiday

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

A car is shipped on a train from Beijing on Sunday, September 28, 2014, after the Beijing Railway Administration launched the country's first "cartransporting train for tourists" to Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, for the upcoming National Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]

Ren Ran, a Beijing resident, plans to visit Hangzhou for the upcoming National Day holiday.

He has booked a rail ticket and even shipped his car, also by rail, to his destination.

The Beijing Railway Administration launched the country's first "car-transporting train for tourists" to Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, on Sunday.

Travelers who shipped their cars on Sunday will leave for Hangzhou on Tuesday from Beijing South Railway Station and pick up their cars on Wednesday at their destination.

They are charged from 3,000 yuan ($490) to 4,000 yuan, round trip, for transportation of their cars.

"Renting a car in Hangzhou costs about 400 to 800 (yuan) a day during the holiday," said Ren. "But it will be more comfortable traveling with my own car."

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Workers load a car onto a Beijing-Hangzhou freight train on Sunday, September 28, 2014. The train is specially arranged by the Beijing Railway Administration for those who want to have a self-drive National Day holiday. With the service, passengers on rail lines linking Beijing and Hangzhou can reach destinations simultaneously with their cars transported by the specific freight train. Over 50 cars will be transported during the upcoming golden week holiday under the service, said the Beijing Railway Administration. [Photo/Xinhua]

Ren is one of 480 million people who will be traveling during the weeklong National Day holiday, as estimated by the China Tourism Academy-an increase of 13 percent from last year.

About 92.7 million people are expected to take to the rails during the upcoming National Day holiday, up 12.9 percent from the previous year, the China Railway Corporation forecast on Sunday.

Ren is excited about the new service, which would not be possible without China's growing network of high-speed rail and an abundance of offers tapping into the tourism potential such a network brings.

China's high-speed railway lines have reached more than 10,000 kilometers, accounting for almost half of the world's total.

Gao Yumei, a resident of Haikou, Hainan's capital city, said she can spend weekends in Sanya, a famous seaside resort more than 300 kilometers away, as often as she wants.

"It used to take me almost a day to go to Sanya by bus," Gao said. "Now it only takes about two hours. I can swim in the ocean and come home the same day."

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Workers load a car onto a Beijing-Hangzhou freight train on Sunday, September 28, 2014. The train is specially arranged by the Beijing Railway Administration for those who want to have a self-drive National Day holiday. With the service, passengers on rail lines linking Beijing and Hangzhou can reach destinations simultaneously with their cars transported by the specific freight train. Over 50 cars will be transported during the upcoming golden week holiday under the service, said the Beijing Railway Administration. [Photo/Xinhua]

Many travel agencies provide routes, based on high-speed railway, that require just one or two days.

Some provinces along the high-speed railways, including the 2,298-kilometer Beijing-Guangzhou Railway, which has 36 stations, have established tourisms routes especially for those taking bullet trains.

However, Wei Xiao'an, an expert on the tourism economy, said there's still much room for improvement when it comes to developing tourism based on the high-speed network.

"Details count," Wei said in a paper devoted to the development of high-speed rail tourism in China. For example, he said, flexibility is needed regarding valid tickets. "In Switzerland, one ticket is valid for 10 days, during which time you could take any train within the country," he said.

In China, the availability of train tickets can be a problem, especially during the peak travel seasons.

"It's hard to book train tickets during festivals," said Gao.

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Categories: Chinaganda

Xinjiang's first high-speed railway to start operation

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

A bullet train runs across a bridge on its trial trip in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 15, 2014. The 1,776-km Lanxin Railway, which links Lanzhou city in northwestern Gansu province and Urumqi city in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, will be Xinjiang's first high-speed railway when it begins operation by the end of this year. The Xinjiang section of the railway will be firstly put into service in October. [Photo/Xinhua]

A bullet train runs across a bridge on its trial trip in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 14, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

A bullet train runs across the Gobi Desert on its trial trip in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 15, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

A bullet train runs across a bridge on its trial trip in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 13, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

A bullet train runs on its trial trip in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 16, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

Workers walk past the Hami Railway Station under construction for the Lanxin Railway in Hami, Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, Sept 28, 2014. [Photo/Xinhua]

  

Xinjiang's first high-speed train draws ever nearer 

Xinjiang braces for first high-speed railway 

Categories: Chinaganda

Concert marks 65th anniversary of new China

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Chinese President Xi Jinping and other leaders attended a concert celebrating the 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on Sep 29, 2014.[Photo/Xinhua]

 BEIJING, Sept 29 -- A concert was held on Monday to celebrate the 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

The concert, with the theme "Beautiful China and Glorious Dream" was held at the Great Hall of the People, watched by about 3,000 people.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and other leaders including Premier Li Keqiang, Zhang Dejiang, Yu Zhengsheng, Liu Yunshan, Wang Qishan and Zhang Gaoli attended the concert.

Retired leaders including Jiang Zemin, Li Peng, Wu Bangguo, Li Lanqing, Zeng Qinghong and He Guoqiang were also present at the event.

China'a National Day falls on Oct 1.

Categories: Chinaganda

Peak may be over for management trainees

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Companies are becoming less interested in the programs

Becoming a "management trainee" at a prestigious multinational company or State-owned enterprise was once a grand aspiration of fresh-faced graduates in China.

But now, the buzzword is hardly ever heard in the job market. Many companies are losing confidence in the approach, according to a recent survey conducted by one of the country's leading recruitment service providers, BRecruit.

About 86 percent of the 300-plus companies polled said they started their management training, or MT, programs between 2006 and 2012. But more than 40 percent have given up the program. Less than 4 percent of those surveyed have launched a program since 2013.

Employers' interest in candidates with MT experience is also declining. Two years ago, more than 80 percent of companies expressed willingness to hire people who have gone through management training. However, starting from this year, only 30 percent of the employers will give extra weight to MT experience - and even those companies said they would need to check out each candidate's qualifications before admission.

About 84 percent of the polled companies said they have been under pressure when carrying out MT programs. Among those that have given up or suspended their MT programs, a large chunk - 47 percent - cite long-term high costs as the top reason. Another 28 percent said the major obstacle has been the difficulty of promoting MTs according to the company's original plans.

Zeng Wu, human resources manager at an investment bank, said the company gave up its MT program two years ago because it failed to retain the talent.

"We did not have a well-planned promotion system. The senior employees are quite discontent with this," he said.

What is more disheartening is that the career future of MTs is not especially promising. Only one-fourth of the MTs were promoted within two to three years of training. More than 32 percent remain at entry level when they completed training. About 28 percent of the trainees quit their jobs before training was completed. Another 11 percent even quit before landing another job.

According to BRecruit, high work pressure, unfair training policies, vague career paths and unreasonable salary structures are the main reasons trainees leave their positions.

Zhan Min, human resources manager at a Shanghai branch of a global retailing company, said the company's MT program was suspended last year because of the corporation's plan to integrate global business. Only one MT stayed through to completion of his training, while the other 20 all quit before finishing.

But there is a glimmer of hope. Management trainees are still in relatively high demand in real estate, fast-moving consumer goods, retail and e-commerce, as well as bioscience industries. This is largely buoyed by the fast-growing e-commerce industry, which has changed the landscape of all industries in some respect, said Pete Chia, managing director of BRecruit China.

shijing@chinadaily.com.cn

(China Daily 09/30/2014 page8)

Categories: Chinaganda

More people willing to work overseas

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Receiving twice the pay of his counterparts back home and working in exotic Ankara, Turkey, Li Hao, 27, may seem to have the ideal job.

Li knows well the bittersweet taste of working as an expatriate, which is becoming more common because of China's expanding economy.

"Compared with my colleagues who work with a clear focus, we in the Turkey office have to spread our energy more broadly, from taxes and customs to financing with banks. We must be ready for changes because of temporary arrangements," said Li, who has been working for an engineering corporation under a State-owned enterprise for a year and a half.

His foreign working experience will not help him land a promotion in the parent company, which is located in Tianjin. So he would like to stay longer, at least three years, to achieve some noteworthy accomplishment.

"After all, we have more chances in foreign countries to sharpen our market skills,"Li said.

Unlike Li, who is pursuing further growth inside a company, Zhu Hongxia quit after she worked in India for a couple of months.

"It's partially because of the overload of work," she said, adding that safety concerns were another reason.

But her work experience in India helped her land her current job as an English teacher at a high school in Changsha, Hunan province.

Increasing numbers of Chinese workers like Li and Zhu have gone global, working overseas for good salaries or a chance to develop future opportunities.

"The fierce competition in the market is another reason to drive them overseas," said Li Ming, director of the labor union department of Sinohydro Corp, which has sent more than 20,000 Chinese workers to its international branches as of the end of 2012.

He said Sinohydro will pay at least double for workers willing to go overseas, which typically do not come with the benefits and subsidies of staying in China.

Salaries and living subsidies, as well as support for families left behind, have been critical factors in expatriates' work success, said Wei Caihong, a leadership practices expert, said in a recent interview with CBN Weekly.

Chinese companies in engineering, energy, high technology communication, consumer electronics and new energy may send expatriate workers to satisfy specific special needs that call on sophisticated skills, technology or other special requirements, she said.

A Mercer survey found that 85 percent of companies have provided subsidies for staff members working in tough situations including places experiencing war or poverty, and recommended a localized compensation system, meaning paying for workers on a local basis in light of taxes and the cost of goods and services.

Around 67 percent of Chinese companies have provided their expatriates with such a localized salary, and more will adopt the system in two years, the survey said.

"In addition to the salary and subsidies, we have provided other necessary comforts, such as taking videos of their families at holidays," Sinohydro's Li said.

Xu Hongcai, director of the information department of the China Center for International Economic Exchanges, agreed with Li on the video meeting with families, saying the psychological needs of workers overseas should be given more attention to ensure they don't have feelings of isolation.

zhengjinran@chinadaily.com.cn

 

An oil exploration team of China Petrochemical Co works in Sudan. Tong Jiang / for China Daily

(China Daily 09/30/2014 page8)

Categories: Chinaganda

China may allow air travelers to use phones in flight mode by 2016

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Chinese airline travelers might be permitted to use mobile phones with in-flight Wi-Fi in 2016, as long as they are in flight mode, although progress still lags behind the rest of the world, the Beijing Times reported.

Zhou Hong, an aviation communication expert, said the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) has been exploring the possibility of air travelers using electronic devices at a height of more than 3,000 meters.

It's estimated that the result will come out in 2016, and it will likely be approved, he said.

China's major airlines and telecommunication companies have been preparing an alliance to conduct research into making phone calls during flights, said He Guili, head of China Telecom Technology Labs under the Ministry of Information and Industry Technology.

He said the main obstacle lies in the compatibility between mobile signals and aircraft electronic navigation systems, but that two solutions offered are already technically mature.

During a test on July 23, about 80 passengers were invited to use China's first onboard Wi-Fi service on a China Eastern Airlines flight between Shanghai and Beijing. They were only allowed to use iPads and laptops, however.

Compared to the boom of Wi-Fi service abroad, the service in China is still in the start-up stage, and has not yet been put into mass commercial use.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has just announced that airlines can now permit passengers to use electronic devices such as mobile phones during flights.

It said electronic devices do not pose a safety risk, and that airlines can allow passengers to use mobile phones once they have conducted their own safety reviews.

Categories: Chinaganda

Skywalk that makes knees go weak

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

A skywalk in central China's Hunan Pingjiang offering a view like no other opened to public on Sept 29, 2014. The bridge, which hangs 180 meters above the ground and is 300 meters long, is made of wood and plexiglass. Some tourists say their legs quivered while walking.[Photo/CFP]


 Chinese flag snapshots go viral Predictions for top 10 most popular destinations during the National holiday 

Two tourists hold the rails of the suspension bridge at a scenic zone in Pingjiang county, Hunan province, Sept 29.[Photo/CFP]



Tourists stand on the suspension bridge at a scenic zone in Pingjiang county, Hunan province, Sept 29.[Photo/CFP]



Three tourists brave their way through the suspension bridge at a scenic zone in Pingjiang county, Hunan province, Sept 29.[Photo/CFP]



Tourists stand on the suspension bridge at a scenic zone in Pingjiang county, Hunan province, Sept 29.[Photo/CFP]


 Chinese flag snapshots go viral Predictions for top 10 most popular destinations during the National holiday 

 

 

 

Categories: Chinaganda

Elderly models add spice to Chongyang Festival

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

Two women take part in a fashion show during an artistic contest for middle-aged and elderly people in Yichang, Central China's Hubei province, Sept 29, 2014. With China's traditional Double Ninth Festival, or Chongyang Festival, coming soon, a team consisting of elderly people shows its confidence and passion during Yichang's first Chongyang Festival artistic contest. [Photo/IC]

 

Chinese life, seen through the lens  Yichun nails down new footbath record for E China  Old soldiers never die 

Team consisting of elderly people takes part in a fashion show, Sept 29, 2014. [Photo/IC]

 

Chinese life, seen through the lens  Yichun nails down new footbath record for E China  Old soldiers never die 

Elderly models display their grace, Sept 29, 2014. [Photo/IC]

 

Chinese life, seen through the lens  Yichun nails down new footbath record for E China  Old soldiers never die 

Dressed-up model on show, Sept 29, 2014. [Photo/IC]

 

Chinese life, seen through the lens  Yichun nails down new footbath record for E China  Old soldiers never die 

Elderly models display their distinct style, Sept 29, 2014. [Photo/IC]

 

Chinese life, seen through the lens  Yichun nails down new footbath record for E China  Old soldiers never die 

 

Categories: Chinaganda

Tour by train with your cars during National Day holiday

China Daily - 2 hours 52 min ago

A car is shipped on a train from Beijing on Sunday, September 28, 2014, after the Beijing Railway Administration launched the country's first "cartransporting train for tourists" to Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, for the upcoming National Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]

Ren Ran, a Beijing resident, plans to visit Hangzhou for the upcoming National Day holiday.

He has booked a rail ticket and even shipped his car, also by rail, to his destination.

The Beijing Railway Administration launched the country's first "car-transporting train for tourists" to Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, on Sunday.

Travelers who shipped their cars on Sunday will leave for Hangzhou on Tuesday from Beijing South Railway Station and pick up their cars on Wednesday at their destination.

They are charged from 3,000 yuan ($490) to 4,000 yuan, round trip, for transportation of their cars.

"Renting a car in Hangzhou costs about 400 to 800 (yuan) a day during the holiday," said Ren. "But it will be more comfortable traveling with my own car."

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Workers load a car onto a Beijing-Hangzhou freight train on Sunday, September 28, 2014. The train is specially arranged by the Beijing Railway Administration for those who want to have a self-drive National Day holiday. With the service, passengers on rail lines linking Beijing and Hangzhou can reach destinations simultaneously with their cars transported by the specific freight train. Over 50 cars will be transported during the upcoming golden week holiday under the service, said the Beijing Railway Administration. [Photo/Xinhua]

Ren is one of 480 million people who will be traveling during the weeklong National Day holiday, as estimated by the China Tourism Academy-an increase of 13 percent from last year.

About 92.7 million people are expected to take to the rails during the upcoming National Day holiday, up 12.9 percent from the previous year, the China Railway Corporation forecast on Sunday.

Ren is excited about the new service, which would not be possible without China's growing network of high-speed rail and an abundance of offers tapping into the tourism potential such a network brings.

China's high-speed railway lines have reached more than 10,000 kilometers, accounting for almost half of the world's total.

Gao Yumei, a resident of Haikou, Hainan's capital city, said she can spend weekends in Sanya, a famous seaside resort more than 300 kilometers away, as often as she wants.

"It used to take me almost a day to go to Sanya by bus," Gao said. "Now it only takes about two hours. I can swim in the ocean and come home the same day."

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Workers load a car onto a Beijing-Hangzhou freight train on Sunday, September 28, 2014. The train is specially arranged by the Beijing Railway Administration for those who want to have a self-drive National Day holiday. With the service, passengers on rail lines linking Beijing and Hangzhou can reach destinations simultaneously with their cars transported by the specific freight train. Over 50 cars will be transported during the upcoming golden week holiday under the service, said the Beijing Railway Administration. [Photo/Xinhua]

Many travel agencies provide routes, based on high-speed railway, that require just one or two days.

Some provinces along the high-speed railways, including the 2,298-kilometer Beijing-Guangzhou Railway, which has 36 stations, have established tourisms routes especially for those taking bullet trains.

However, Wei Xiao'an, an expert on the tourism economy, said there's still much room for improvement when it comes to developing tourism based on the high-speed network.

"Details count," Wei said in a paper devoted to the development of high-speed rail tourism in China. For example, he said, flexibility is needed regarding valid tickets. "In Switzerland, one ticket is valid for 10 days, during which time you could take any train within the country," he said.

In China, the availability of train tickets can be a problem, especially during the peak travel seasons.

"It's hard to book train tickets during festivals," said Gao.

A peak into China's largest technical school   Crab harvest in Yangcheng Lake Ways to promote real estate sales 

Categories: Chinaganda

The Tank Man 6-4

Mark Roswell aka Da Shan

Best Friends Forever: Canada and China